Last week, the SEC’s Division of Corporation Finance issued updated guidance on processing procedures for draft registration statements. Below is a FAQ summary table we have prepared related to this new guidance.

There are some nuances in the guidance, so please consult with outside securities counsel before omitting any financial statements in your filing. Contact any member of our Corporate & Securities practice for more information.

Continue Reading 7 Answers to FAQs About the New SEC Guidance for Draft Registration Statements

Last month, the Staff of the SEC’s Division of Corporation Finance announced that, as part of the Division’s ongoing efforts to facilitate capital formation, all issuers are now permitted to submit draft registration statements relating to IPOs and Exchange Act Section 12(b) registration (e.g., spin-offs) to the Staff for nonpublic (i.e., confidential) review.

Previously, nonpublic review was available only to emerging growth companies (EGCs), as authorized by the JOBS Act, and in certain circumstances to foreign private issuers. Nonpublic submission of registration statements makes it possible for companies to avoid alerting the market of offering plans before the company is certain that it will move forward with any offering.

Continue Reading SEC Extends Confidential Review of Certain Registration Statements to Non-EGCs

I wrote an article published by Securities Regulation Daily discussing the upcoming “say-when-on-pay” votes that many companies will hold during their annual meetings this year. Because Dodd-Frank mandates that the vote be held every six years, a great portion of companies last held the say-when-on-pay vote immediately following the enactment of Dodd-Frank in 2011 and must vote again in 2017. The say-when-on-pay vote is a non-binding advisory referendum on the frequency of a non-binding advisory vote regarding executive compensation.

While the vote was relatively anticlimactic in 2011 due to the wide regard many institutional shareholders held for annual say-on-pay votes, it is worth noting the importance of the Form 8-K disclosure requirements in relation to the vote.

To review details on these technical requirements as outlined in the full article – download PDF. The full article, “Annual Meeting 8-K: Don’t Forget Say-When-on-Pay Determination,” was published by Securities Regulation Daily on June 15, 2017.

In monitoring SEC comment letters, we came across this SEC comment letter made public today, which we thought of particular interest to our readership given its direct application to almost all public companies. In the letter, the SEC Staff expressly concludes that simply including a URL address in an earnings press release that directs readers to a website where the non-GAAP reconciliation is located does not comply with the requirements in Item 10(e)(1)(i) of Regulation S-K (i.e., “must include….in the filing…a reconciliation”) and the general rules regarding disclosure of non-GAAP financial measures outlined in Regulation G (i.e., “must accompany that non-GAAP financial measure with…a reconciliation”). Although this is the Staff’s current position, we believe this may be an interesting area to watch in light of the SEC’s recent rulemaking in the hyperlinking space (see this post) as well as continued innovation in electronic communication and IR practices.

Continue Reading SEC Staff Says No to Hyperlinking Non-GAAP Reconciliations in the Earnings Press Release

Last week, as reported by The Wall Street Journal, POLITICO and others, the House voted for a sweeping rewrite of the Dodd-Frank Act. According to Politico, “The legislation, approved without a single Democratic vote, represents the GOP’s opening salvo in the debate over easing the rules on the financial system, a move sparked by the election of President Donald Trump and Republican control of Congress.”

For our prior coverage of the CHOICE Act, see these posts here and here.

Below are three takeaways on the CHOICE Act passage:

  • There is a strong GOP push to significantly revise the rules governing Wall Street. In addition to the CHOICE Act, on Monday, June 12, the U.S. Department of the Treasury released its much anticipated financial regulatory reform report. This report stems from the President’s February 2017 Executive Order on “Core Principles for Regulating the U.S. Financial System” where the Secretary of the Treasury was to “identify any laws, treaties, regulations, guidance, reporting and record keeping requirements, and other Government policies that inhibit Federal regulation of the U.S. financial system in a manner consistent with the core principles.”

Continue Reading 3 Takeaways from the Recent House Passage of the Financial CHOICE Act

This post was updated on August 16, 2017, and September 12, 2017, to include the eleventh and twelfth FAQs, respectively.

1. What are the new rules on exhibit hyperlinks generally?
On March 1, 2017, the SEC voted to adopt new rules and form amendments to make it easier for investors and other market participants to find and access exhibits in registration statements and periodic reports. The amendments will require registrants to include a hyperlink to each exhibit in the filing’s exhibit index.  Currently, someone seeking to retrieve and access an exhibit that has been incorporated by reference must review the exhibit index to determine the filing in which the exhibit is included, and then must search through the registrant’s filings to locate the relevant filing.

The amendments require registrants that file registration statements or reports subject to the exhibit requirements under Item 601 of Regulation S-K, or that file Forms F-10 or 20-F, to include a hyperlink to each exhibit listed in the exhibit index of these filings, and to submit such registration statements and reports on EDGAR in HyperText Markup Language (HTML) format.

Continue Reading 10 FAQs on the New SEC Rules on Exhibit Hyperlinks (plus two bonus questions!)

Recently, I wrote a blog post about the anticipated update to the Financial CHOICE Act and a leaked memo from Jeb Hersarling, Chair of the House Financial Services Committee, to the Committee’s Leadership Team regarding proposed changes from the original Financial CHOICE Act introduced last year.

For legal teams updating directors and management teams on developments in Congress that may impact them in the near term, here are just some of the items to consider for this Act that would have an immediate impact on public companies (and probably well-received):

Continue Reading More on the Financial CHOICE Act 2.0

In the past couple days, much has been written about the contents of a leaked memo from Jeb Hersarling, Chair of the House Financial Services Committee, to the Committee’s Leadership Team. The memo, of which we have obtained a copy and posted here, outlines proposed changes from the original Financial CHOICE Act, introduced last year. The original version of the Financial CHOICE Act is located here.

According to sources, the current word (for whatever current “word” is worth nowadays) is that the revised draft of the Financial CHOICE Act may come out end of month with a pretty quick mark-up in March. Additionally, some think that if the repeal of the Durbin Amendment (which limits the fees that may be charged to retailers for debit card processing) remains in the bill, then that provision may hold it all up given that opposition doesn’t necessarily divide along party lines, but rather along who has a large bank or retail headquarter in their district.

Continue Reading What to Expect in the New Financial CHOICE Act (2.0)

Following the completion of one of the most divisive presidential elections in U.S. history, the election of President Trump and the retention of Republican majorities in both the U.S. Senate and House will impact the public disclosures of many U.S. public companies. The expectation of the securities markets that the results of these elections will significantly impact the prospects of many companies was reflected in the sharp movements in the stock prices in various sectors which occurred shortly after the 2016 elections. While the overall stock market trend since the 2016 elections has been positive, companies in certain sectors such as manufacturing and financial institutions have achieved gains significantly in excess of market norms, with companies in other sectors, such as utility and certain healthcare sectors, having underperformed in relation to market norms (although some healthcare companies have recovered from stock market declines seen in the immediate aftermath of the elections).

Continue Reading The Trump Effect: The Impact of the 2016 Elections on Public Company Securities Disclosures